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Indonesia: North Sulawesi

Average
168
Score

Bunaken Island and Manado

Diving

Assessment averages for this location:

The above score is the average score of all the Green Fins members assessed in this location within the last 18 months. Scores range from 0 (no environmental impact) to a maximum of 330. The lower the score the better. The graph shows the average scores for each Code of Conduct (COC) points with the red line representing the highest possible score.

Each COC score is weighted, meaning the most environmentally threatening activities are given a higher score. This allows you to see where the impacts are occurring For more information please go to the Assessments page.

ACTIVE - Member assessed within the last 18 months
INACTIVE - Member not assessed within the last 18 months and 'greyed out'
SUSPENDED - Member is not on display

The score above is an average score of all the Green Fins members assessed within the last 18 months. This score is out of a maximum score of 330 with a 0 score representing 0 impact on the environment. The lower the score the better. The graph represents the average scores for each of the Code of Conduct (COC) points with the red line being the highest score available for that point. It is a weighted system so COC 5,15 and 9 etc are the most serious impacts. This allows you to see where the impacts are on. For more information please go to the Assessments page.

 

Description

Bunaken Island

A small but highly biodiverse island, Bunaken sits just off the main land from the city of Manado, North Sulawesi. Diving is now highly popular and has been attracting tourists for many years who have come far and wide to dive in these fascinating waters. Strong currents attract large pelagic species with healthy mangroves and seagrass ecosystems in the vicinity that go to providing both an open water experience as well as a world famous macro popular with photographers. Nearby Lembeh is where the Mimic Octopus was first described and the deep waters that surround Manado is where a few specimens of Coelacanths have been caught by fishermen in the past.

Members in Bunaken Island and Manado